Recent Changes

Saturday, April 16

  1. page THE MEESES edited ... Heritage Minute: Canadian Residential Schools {CoR_pd-341-122b%20(2)_a.jpg} ... residenti…
    ...
    Heritage Minute: Canadian Residential Schools
    {CoR_pd-341-122b%20(2)_a.jpg}
    ...
    residential school.
    {P75-103_S7-87.jpg}
    These schools faced alot of criticism and sure I missed my family but I did make friends.
    ...
    and sewing. Skills that allowed us to integrate and become valued members of Canadian Society.
    While it wasn't perfect and there were mistakes made
    {10853_226995227651_154777717651_4177678_296023_n.jpg}
    Now
    >Now I display
    ...
    and believed.
    -Jessica
    This class has caused us to wonder if group accounts of histroy like that in this wiki or wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historiography) create a better view then the traditional narrative or linear approach? Do they allow for more critical and open approaches or do they simply permit additional room for error which can be taken as fact? Currently internet and group mediums for histroy like Wikipedia are quickly becoming the go to source for all of our historical questions. We don't have an answer to the question but believe that it should be considered serious food for thought.
    -tony
    (view changes)
    12:43 pm

Tuesday, April 5

  1. page THE MEESES edited ... -Pierre Trudeau -jessica Heritage Minute: Canadian Residential Schools {CoR_pd-341-122b%20…
    ...
    -Pierre Trudeau
    -jessica
    Heritage Minute: Canadian Residential Schools
    {CoR_pd-341-122b%20(2)_a.jpg}
    As a young girl I attended a Canadian residential school.
    {P75-103_S7-87.jpg}
    These schools faced alot of criticism and sure I missed my family but I did make friends.
    {14%20-%20p75-103-s1-179%20low%20res.jpg}
    and we learned important skills like reading, writing
    {imagesCABEJNGH.jpg}
    and sewing. Skills that allowed us to integrate and become valued members of Canadian Society.
    While it wasn't perfect and there were mistakes made
    {10853_226995227651_154777717651_4177678_296023_n.jpg}
    Now I display my proud heritage as both an Aboriginal and a Canadian.
    A satyrical take on the Heritage minute, hoping to show that even things recognized as truly negative and blights on our history can with time be presented in a manner which may be accepted, digested and believed.
    -Jessica
    This class has caused us to wonder if group accounts of histroy like that in this wiki or wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historiography) create a better view then the traditional narrative or linear approach? Do they allow for more critical and open approaches or do they simply permit additional room for error which can be taken as fact? Currently internet and group mediums for histroy like Wikipedia are quickly becoming the go to source for all of our historical questions. We don't have an answer to the question but believe that it should be considered serious food for thought.

    (view changes)
    10:30 am
  2. page Anything but the Canucks edited ... Lowenthal, David. The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History. Cambridge: Cambridge Univers…
    ...
    Lowenthal, David. The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 1998.The Celtic Colours International Festival
    The Celtic Colours International Festival
    {CC_2003.jpg}== {CC_2003.jpg}
    ==

    The Celtic Colours International Festival was started in 1997 as a means for Nova Scotians to celebrate their Scottish heritage. This is particularly focused however, in Cape Breton where the festival is based and where scotish sentiment and pride is particularly felt. The festival is frequently focused around highland activities, music, and most importantly, tourist revenues, being one of the largest economic draws for the Island well known for its economic hardships following the centralization and closing of many major local industries such as coal mining and steel.
    Where this 9-day festival becomes more complicated, and enters the conversation of imagined communities, nation building, and usable pasts is when one realized how much of our self-evidently ancient Highland traditions is when one begins to look into how much of these acts were created or transplanted by class-conscious middle class creatures of culture, and how through government intervention this notion of “tartarising” NS became a provincial and eventually national dialogue on the character of Nova Scotians. This is not to say that NS doesn’t truly have a Scottish history, with the Scottish immigrants aboard the Hector in Pictou County being a well recorded and celebrated arrival, along with the thousands upon thousands of immigrants who followed, settling all across NS centering in Cape Breton.
    ...
    This desire to present NS as a nostalgic haven of the golden age led to unexpected developments, such as the creation of the NS tartan, which allowed all nova scotians to display this Scottish pride, even if they themselves were of a different ancestry, an act which took the highland character from the rural towns of Cape Breton and applied it to all of the “Essentially Scottish” Nova Scotia.
    {d6112.jpg} This acceptance of newly implemented traditions, and Nova Scotia’s overwhelming acceptance of them as true and historical, shows the power of “usable pasts” and how a nations history can be reinterpreted to fit any national need, in this case the need to create a tourism industry, and how the state by financing festivals like this to allow the general population to celebrate its Scottish culture (be it real or not) demonstrates the creation of an imagined community of the Scottish Canadian, who can all relate and connect to (as well as hopefully purchase) these cultural symbols such as the kilt and the bagpipe to represent their hearty tough NS image, as well as the anti-modernist undertones used to repaint provincial economic trouble. People everywhere can now purchase a NS tartan kilt, and celebrate their provinces new history as their own, creating a more stable collective culture taken from the unstable realm of history. {cpt10542800_high.jpg}
    - Kevin Fallis
    (view changes)
    10:18 am
  3. page Anything but the Canucks edited ... The Fortress of Louisbourg is now a meeting ground between two identities where their heritage…
    ...
    The Fortress of Louisbourg is now a meeting ground between two identities where their heritage is celebrated and preserved within the fort.
    By: Kayla Samson
    ...
    Cambridge University, 1998.
    1998.The Celtic Colours International Festival
    The Celtic Colours International Festival
    {CC_2003.jpg}
    The Celtic Colours International Festival was started in 1997 as a means for Nova Scotians to celebrate their Scottish heritage. This is particularly focused however, in Cape Breton where the festival is based and where scotish sentiment and pride is particularly felt. The festival is frequently focused around highland activities, music, and most importantly, tourist revenues, being one of the largest economic draws for the Island well known for its economic hardships following the centralization and closing of many major local industries such as coal mining and steel.
    Where this 9-day festival becomes more complicated, and enters the conversation of imagined communities, nation building, and usable pasts is when one realized how much of our self-evidently ancient Highland traditions is when one begins to look into how much of these acts were created or transplanted by class-conscious middle class creatures of culture, and how through government intervention this notion of “tartarising” NS became a provincial and eventually national dialogue on the character of Nova Scotians. This is not to say that NS doesn’t truly have a Scottish history, with the Scottish immigrants aboard the Hector in Pictou County being a well recorded and celebrated arrival, along with the thousands upon thousands of immigrants who followed, settling all across NS centering in Cape Breton.
    However, this Festival does show the provincial zenith of the tartarisation of NS in the 50’s following thirty years of depression, as a means to reinvent the marginalized Nova Scotian as the pure and folksy highlander, which fit well with the anti-modernist ideals that tourists at the time were extremely interested in buying into. Many of these traditions and artefacts were created or reinterpreted with this goal of revenue in mind, “rediscovering” its Scottish roots in the form or folklore and handicrafts, and presented to the tourists in the most consumer friendly manner possible.
    This desire to present NS as a nostalgic haven of the golden age led to unexpected developments, such as the creation of the NS tartan, which allowed all nova scotians to display this Scottish pride, even if they themselves were of a different ancestry, an act which took the highland character from the rural towns of Cape Breton and applied it to all of the “Essentially Scottish” Nova Scotia.
    {d6112.jpg} This acceptance of newly implemented traditions, and Nova Scotia’s overwhelming acceptance of them as true and historical, shows the power of “usable pasts” and how a nations history can be reinterpreted to fit any national need, in this case the need to create a tourism industry, and how the state by financing festivals like this to allow the general population to celebrate its Scottish culture (be it real or not) demonstrates the creation of an imagined community of the Scottish Canadian, who can all relate and connect to (as well as hopefully purchase) these cultural symbols such as the kilt and the bagpipe to represent their hearty tough NS image, as well as the anti-modernist undertones used to repaint provincial economic trouble. People everywhere can now purchase a NS tartan kilt, and celebrate their provinces new history as their own, creating a more stable collective culture taken from the unstable realm of history. {cpt10542800_high.jpg}

    (view changes)
    10:17 am
  4. file d6112.jpg uploaded
    10:15 am
  5. 10:15 am
  6. file CC_2003.jpg uploaded
    10:15 am
  7. 10:09 am

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